Basics of continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatrics
Jacob C. John , Sara Taha , Timothy E. Bunchman
Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Richmond at the Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
Correspondence to: Timothy E. Bunchman
Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Richmond at the Virginia Commonwealth University, 1000 E Broad St, PO Box 980498, Richmond VA 23298, USA. E-mail: Timothy.bunchman@vcuhealth.org

Edited by Gheun-Ho Kim, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Received: May 29, 2019; Revised: July 23, 2019; Accepted: August 16, 2019; Published online: October 30, 2019.
© The Korean Society of Nephrology. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
In the last three decades, significant advances have been made in the care of children requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). The move from the use of only hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis to continuous venovenous hemofiltration with or without dialysis (continuous renal replacement therapy, CRRT) has become a mainstay in many intensive care units. The move to CRRT is the result of greater clinical experience as well as advances in equipment, solutions, vascular access, and anticoagulation. CRRT is the mainstay of dialysis in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for critically ill children who often have hemodynamic compromise. The advantages of this modality include the ability to promote both solute and fluid clearance in a slow continuous manner. Though data exist suggesting that approximately 25% of children in any PICU may have some degree of renal insufficiency, the true need for RRT is approximately 4% of PICU admissions. This article will review the history as well as the progress being made in the provision of this care in children.
Keywords: Child, Kidney failure, Renal replacement therapy


e-submission

This Article


Cited By Articles
  • CrossRef (0)
  • PMC (0)
  • SCOPUS (0)

Services
Social Network Service

Archives

Indexed/Covered by